How to Get the Most Out of Your Jogging Stroller

Jogging


The years feel long and the nights short when your children are small enough to be pushed in a stroller on runs. Yet, before you know it, you're running side-by-side with the same little person you once pushed on a 20-mile training run. 

As I reflect back on over nine years of running with a single, double or triple running stroller, here are six things I wish I could go back and tell my new mommy self.

Stroller Running is Hard, but Not Impossible 

Running with a stroller is difficult, there's no other way to dice it. Think of it as you would a race distance that once seemed impossible; once you start doing it you realize that, while it may take more work than what you have done in the past, it's completely possible. 

Some is Better Than None

If you train for races, you are more than likely going to follow a weekly training plan. Children, however, don't care what your mileage goal is for that day. 

Instead of being frustrated at not getting in the miles that you wanted on a specific day, tell yourself that some is better than none. Having a flexible attitude will keep you from feeling bitter over a run cut short. 

On days that everything seems to be clicking and your child (or children) is enjoying the run, tack on some extra miles. Run what the day gives you and never beat yourself up for what you did or did not do.

Always be Prepared

Snacks, sunscreen, bug spray, blankets, more snacks, coloring books, water, a bottle—the list goes on. The more prepared you are on a run, the more enjoyable your run will be. 

Quick Tip

Rewarding your child for being cooperative on a long run turns the situation into a win-win.

Sitting still for a long period of time is hard for a wiggly toddler. Give your child a reason to enjoy the runs you go on. Save a special book or a special game specifically for stroller runs. Bring their favorite snack or even treats to reward a patient child. 

A crying baby or toddler is the worst, and so are the looks you'll get from strangers judging you as you push them in a stroller. Being prepared decreases the chances of meltdowns happening on a run.

Be Encouraged by What You Accomplish

Every month or so I would head to a flat-ish area and see how fast I could run a mile pushing my kids. I had different PRs based on how many kids I was pushing or even which stroller I used. 

Did these numbers matter to anyone but me? No. But they did encourage me. Giving myself little things to be proud of made stroller running more rewarding. I found ways to see improvements that motivated me to run more often.

Long Runs are Possible

Being prepared will one day give you the option to go on a long run, if you so choose. It took me years to realize that because my children had grown up in the stroller, it wasn't something they minded all that much. 

When I had more flexibility and someone to watch them while I ran on the weekends, I often opted to bring one of them with me for company. To this day, pushing my daughter on a 20-mile run while training for the Boston Marathon remains one of my favorite running memories. 

When I have a moment on a solo long run where I am doubting my abilities, I remind myself what I've been able to do in the past while pushing a stroller and it snaps me out of doubting myself.

Embrace It

For some, stroller running isn't an optional activity; it's the only way to fit in a run. Embrace it. 

Yes, it's hard. Yes, it's often much easier to run alone. Yes, you may want a break from your kids. But this stroller is allowing you to do something you love, and something you may not have been able to do that day with out it. 

You have the option of allowing the stroller to give you the gift of a run. It might not be far, it might not be fast and it might not even be what you wanted—but it was a run, and for that be thankful.

Active logoFind activities for kids near you.

About the Author

Dorothy Beal

Dorothy Beal is an RRCA and USATF Level 1 Certified Running Coach. She became a marathoner in 2003 and hasn't looked back since. She is the creator of the I RUN THIS BODY™ and #IHaveARunnersBody MOVEments. When not training for marathons or chasing her three children around, you can find her sharing her active life in pictures on Instagram or talking about all things running on her blog at mile-posts.com.

Dorothy Beal is an RRCA and USATF Level 1 Certified Running Coach. She became a marathoner in 2003 and hasn't looked back since. She is the creator of the I RUN THIS BODY™ and #IHaveARunnersBody MOVEments. When not training for marathons or chasing her three children around, you can find her sharing her active life in pictures on Instagram or talking about all things running on her blog at mile-posts.com.

Discuss This Article

Get ACTIVE on the Go

Active Kids App
Active Kids App

Active Kids App

Parenting just got a little easier with the largest kids activity app on the planet.

Available for iOS | Android

Latest In Parenting and family

Connect With Us