That Time I Tried Hot Yoga With My Kids

Saturday Morning, Supine (Sort Of) Crow

Saturday morning was the first class we all took together. I reminded my son to breathe and relax and suggested my daughter watch someone with more skill than myself. They did not do these things. My son still took every pose as a personal challenge. My daughter followed me. 

After class, my son stayed a few extra minutes, enjoying the rest after a hard class (It's also possible he couldn't get up yet, because, yoga as a personal challenge). My daughter bolted for the cooler hall. She told me that yoga was fun, but she's not sure she really likes to sweat that much.

What We All Learned

We all agreed that it was an interesting way to stretch all our bodies and our brains.  My son said he likes it because if makes him feel calm, which surprised him. My daughter likes the breathing and thinks she might get better at push-ups—if she decides to sweat more.

I learned that my kids approach a new experience in their own unique ways, no matter what I suggest. And it was a good reminder that my daughter will continue to watch me, even amongst louder voices and more experienced people. She might not always admit it, but she is still looking to me for guidance. 

Where Do We Go From Here?

We've yet to see if yoga will be either of their "thing." We all like that it's something we can do together. One of my favorite aspects of parenting is watching my kids gain confidence in their abilities, and I'd love to see that transformation in the yoga studio. But the reality of life, time and my kids' love for other sports may make practicing together regularly a challenge. And that's OK. They know how yoga makes them feel. Maybe now or someday later, when they need a space to take a breath, they'll find their feet grounded in a yoga pose. 

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About the Author

Beth Swanson

Beth Swanson is a freelance writer and physical therapist in Washington State. She writes about parenting, active family life, health, and technology, and how those topics often relate to one other. Follow her on Twitter @write4chocolate.
Beth Swanson is a freelance writer and physical therapist in Washington State. She writes about parenting, active family life, health, and technology, and how those topics often relate to one other. Follow her on Twitter @write4chocolate.

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